Ransomware Attacks are Increasing Against Established Organizations

When it comes to ransomware, this cyberattack scheme isn’t new, but it has become increasingly common over the past several years. Many of the viruses lurking out there steal data to be used for nefarious purposes, with the goal having long been to access important financial and personal data that can be sold off. Not ransomware. Ransomware generally does not access your data to sell off to criminals. Instead, the virus kidnaps your data until you pay the ransom.

Understanding How Ransomware is Different

Going back to other forms of cyber-attacks: they focus on credit card numbers that can be sold and used to buy things or social security numbers that can be sold to be used to create fake identities. In the case of many viruses, victims may never even be aware their data has been accessed. Typical malware and spyware tries to go undetected.

How Ransomware Works

Ransomware stops you from using your PC, files, or programs. It holds your data, software, or entire PC hostage until you pay a ransom to get it back. When an attack occurs, you suddenly have no access to a computer – a screen appears announcing your files are encrypted and that you need to pay (usually in bitcoins) to regain access. In some cases, there may be a nerve-wracking clock ticking down to the deadline for the ransom payment. Some versions are so sophisticated they even have mini call centers to handle your payments and questions.

What Happens After a Ransomware Attack?

Ransomware stands out from most viruses in that you really have no option once an attack has been made. You either pay up or lose the data.

Have a Data Backup?

The only sure answer is a safe, clean backup. In that case, you are stuck with the nuisance of restoring your data with the backup, but you aren’t out any money. However, this comes with a caveat: your backups have to be clean. The problem with ransomware viruses is that just making backups may not be sufficient to protect your data, as the backups can be infected also.

Have a Disaster Recovery Plan?

The only answer is to be aware that these viruses are out there and that you have to make careful, specific plans to protect your data. It is essential that your backup and disaster recovery plans are designed with a ransomware attack in mind. When it comes to making data security and disaster recovery plans, you should consider bringing in experts with a strong background in this field. Lost data is not something any contact center can easily recover from.

Further Reading on Ransomware

Want to learn more? Check out our other blog articles on ransomware, from how to deal with it to how Triton Technologies protects against it.

Want to learn more about proactive protection and talk about your practice’s cybersecurity? Contact us today. We don’t just protect against ransomware but provide a full suite of cybersecurity and IT support for all your projects and IT infrastructure.

Three Responses After a Ransomware Attack

Ransomware is a type of computer virus that kidnaps your data and holds it hostage for money. It has become increasingly common, attacking governments and all manner of business as well as non-for profit institutions. If you are unfortunate enough to be the victim of a ransomware attack, there are basically only three options open to you.

What to Do After a Ransomware Attack

Why is ransomware so nasty? Because it steals the most important thing your business possesses. Data. Worse, once infected, there isn’t generally a way out. No one can “disinfect” your machine. You aren’t going to be able to call in IT support to solve the problem. Basically, you have three options.

Do What the Hackers Ask

Pay the ransom. This payment is usually via credit card or bitcoin (a digital currency). Some ransomware viruses even provide helplines if you’re having trouble. Of course, there are no guarantees you will get access to your data – these are thieves you’re dealing with. Plus, you’re going to only ensure more ransomware attacks will happen.

Refuse to Pay to Get Your Data Back

Don’t pay and lose your data – This has its obvious downsides, unless…

Being Prepared with a Backup

You have a safe, clean backup. In that case, you are stuck with the nuisance of restoring your data with the backup, but you aren’t out any money. However, this comes with a caveat: your backups have to be clean. The problem with ransomware viruses is that just making backups may not be sufficient to protect your data, as the backups can be infected also.

Ransomware Requires Prevention and Backups

As you can see, the first two options aren’t very favorable solutions. The only real defense against an attack is the third option. You have to be prepared ahead of time with a safe, segregated backup. Be sure to get the advice of a specialist on how to protect your data from this very serious threat to your business. In addition, you can bolster your cybersecurity through:

Contact Triton Technologies today to learn how we don’t just protect against ransomware but provide a full suite of cybersecurity and IT support for all your projects and IT infrastructure.